Stories — Peter Leyden

“Leyden also makes the case that most people are underestimating the positive potential of a dozen driving forces he calls The Inexorables that will play out in the coming decades and could help solve our biggest challenges. He ends with acknowledgments for the 25 world-class experts and innovators who he interviewed for this ambitious project.”

Stories — Peter Leyden
https://www.peterleyden.com/stories
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Global emotions map: We're more stressed out than ever - Big Think



  • Tired of surveys predictably putting Scandinavia at the top of "happiest country" lists? Here’s a similar poll with some surprises. 
  • The region with the highest reported levels of positive experiences? Central America. The country with the least negative experiences? Kazakhstan. 
  • Some certainties can’t be avoided: Afghanistan is top in negative experiences, bottom in positive experiences
Good morning, ladies and gentlemen

The Great Progression, 2025-2050 - Big Think

https://bigthink.com/progress/the-great-progression-peter-leyden/

Most people are stuck in the familiar default frame that sees many of our old systems breaking down in the face of myriad challenges like climate change, polarized politics, economic and social inequities, the paralysis of liberal democracies, and the rise of authoritarian states. That’s as far as they can see.

Yet we’re now at the point where we can view what’s happening, and what’s soon coming, through the lens of the future. That view sees the many nascent systems emerging that are superseding the old ones breaking down. This perspective sees many slow-moving positive developments coming to head, transformative technologies ready to scale, and new trends building to the tipping point. This perspective focuses not on breakdown but on rebirth.

Collapse, Renewal and the Rope of History

“Kurt Vonnegut, the great observer of the horrors and ironies of 20th-century civilization, once said that his ‘prettiest’ contribution to culture wasn’t his novels, but his Master’s thesis in anthropology for the University of Chicago. His idea, which was rejected because “it was too simple and looked like too much fun” was that stories have shapes, and that the shape of any given civilization’s stories are as interesting as the shape of its arrowheads or pottery.


To illustrate his point, Vonnegut plotted the story of Cinderella on a graph, charting misery versus ecstasy over time. The arrival of the fairy godmother kicks off a step by step climb in fortune, leading to a high point at the ball, followed by a sudden reversal at the stroke of midnight. The good times come roaring back though, thanks to that glass slipper, leaving our protagonist even better off than she was before. This arc, said Vonnegut, is evident in some of our favourite stories, from the New Testament to Jane Eyre and Frozen. It’s immensely satisfying, hence its enduring appeal.”

Collapse, Renewal and the Rope of History
https://futurecrunch.com/collapse-renewal/
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Collapse, Renewal and the Rope of History

“In Indonesia, one of the world’s biggest palm oil growers has announced a plan to rehabilitate an area half the size of New York to atone for its past clearing of rainforests and peatlands. In Bolivia, a massive new two million acre reserve has been established on the Amazon’s deforestation frontier, thanks to a partnership between indigenous communities and private donors. Last month, the United States restored protections for the Tongass National Forest in Alaska, the largest intact temperate rainforest in the world, home to thousands of watersheds and fjords, and more than a thousand forested islands. The new protections will end large-scale old growth logging and support restoration, climate resilience, and recreation.”

Collapse, Renewal and the Rope of History
https://futurecrunch.com/collapse-renewal/
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Decarbonisation

https://www.exponentialview.co/ev-342p

While scientists have recently warned about worsening global warming, the goals are still in place, and we must find creative ways to meet them. The Energy Transitions Commission has just released a list of actionsthat can be taken on a large scale to keep the 1.5°C target alive. These include rapid reductions in methane emissions, halting deforestation, beginning reforestation, decarbonising the power sector and phasing out coal. What’s remarkable about the report is how clearly it identifies the steps that need to be taken to safeguard the planet. We have the road map; we need capital and governments to follow it.